Low Fat Vegan Recipe Blog

100 Best Vegan Protein Sources

100 Best Sources of Vegan Protein

Q: How do vegans get their protein? What foods have protein?

A: All whole plant foods have protein, some foods are more protein rich than others. Eating a calorically sufficient amount of food per day, a vegan/vegetarian will have no problem getting enough protein! All these items on the list are good sources of protein.

Q: What is protein?

A: An amino acid. The word ‘protein’ refers to a type of molecule in food that can be broken down into amino acids. The body needs twenty amino acids – as a biological machine it can create eleven of these itself. However there are nine, called ‘esse
ntial amino acids’ that the body cannot create and has to gain through the consumption of food.

These ‘essential amino acids’ are: Tryptophan, Threonine, Isoleucine, Leucine, Lysine, Methionine, Phenylalanine, Valine and Histidine. All of which are found in plant foods. Below have compiled a list of different foods that have these amino acids and how much of their recommended daily intake you can get from the specific portion size.

“But I need animal protein!”

A: The protein that is exclusively found in animal products are nonessential amino acids, meaning we do not need to consume them from food because our body produces it internally. The essential amino acids are listed below and are available in plant foods. Keep in mind this is only a very short list, but to list every single plant food on here would be tedious.

You can never have too much protein!!?

A: Do you know when a human is growing at his fastest? When he is a baby of course! Mother’s milk is comprised roughly of 5% of its calories coming from protein. We don’t need excessive amounts of protein when we are growing at our peak, only sufficient calories and nutrition. Infact, consuming too much protein can cause a host of health issues. From kidney failure, liver damage, constipation.. to weight gain, halitosis, and dehydration. Consuming too much protein is a very easy thing to do! But incase you’re worried about your protein intake, here are some high protein vegan foods!

Hope you enjoy! I love making these types of lists. If you have any future suggestions for compiled lists, please comment below! Also, if there is anything on this particular list about plant based protein that you’d like me to add in, please comment below!

HIGH PROTEIN VEGAN FOODS

Nuts and Seeds:

  • 37g Protein – Hemp Seeds
  • 33g Protein – Pepitas (Pumpkin Seeds)
  • 24g Protein – Black Walnuts
  • 24g Protein – Peanuts (Roasted)
  • 21g Protein – Almonds
  • 20g Protein – Sunflower Seeds
  • 20g Protein – Pistachio Nuts
  • 18g Protein – Flaxseed
  • 18g Protein – Cashews
  • 17g Protein – Sesame Seeds
  • 16g Protein – Chia Seeds
  • 15g Protein – Brown Walnuts
  • 15g Protein – Hazelnuts
  • 14g Protein – Brazil Nuts
  • 14g Protein – Pine Nuts
  • 10g Protein – Coconut Meat
  • 9g Protein – Pecans
  • 8g Protein – Macadamia Nuts

Grains:

  • 17g Protein – Oats
  • 15g Protein – Rye
  • 15g Protein – Wild Rice
  • 15g Protein – Kamut
  • 15g Protein – Spelt
  • 14g Protein – Quinoa
  • 14g Protein – Wheat
  • 14g Protein – Amaranth
  • 13g Protein – Teff
  • 13g Protein – Buckwheat
  • 13g Protein – Triticale
  • 13g Protein – Couscous
  • 12g Protein – Barley
  • 11g Protein – Sorghum
  • 11g Protein – Millet
  • 8g Protein – Cornmeal
  • 8g Protein – White Rice
  • 8g Protein – Brown Rice

Vegetables:

  • 57g Protein – Spirullina, Dried
  • 11g Protein – Sundried Tomatoes
  • 10g Protein – Shiitake Mushrooms, Dried
  • 9g Protein – Wood Ear Mushrooms, Dried
  • 6g Protein – Seaweed, Laver, Raw
  • 6g Protein- Grape leaves
  • 5g Protein – Peas, Green
  • 5g Protein – Bitter Gourd, Leafy Tips
  • 4g Protein– Kale
  • 4g Protein – Broccoli
  • 4g Protein – Fresh Corn
  • 4g Protein – Brussel Sprouts
  • 4g Protein – Bok Choy
  • 4g Protein – Snow Peas
  • 3g Protein – Spinach, cooked
  • 3g Protein – Artichokes
  • 3g Protein – Wakame Seaweed, Fresh
  • 2g Protein –Sweet Potato, Baked
  • 5g Protein – Potato, Cooked

Legumes:

  • 40g Protein – Soybeans, roasted
  • 18g Protein – Tempeh
  • 15g Protein – Lupin Beans (Cooked)
  • 10g Protein – Winged Beans, Cooked
  • 10g Protein – White Beans (Cooked)
  • 9g Protein – Black Beans (Frijoles Negros) (Cooked)
  • 9g Protein – Yellow Beans (Cooked)
  • 9g Protein – Small White Beans (Cooked)
  • 9g Protein – Pinto Beans (Cooked)
  • 9g Protein – Pink Beans (Cooked)
  • 8g Protein – Tofu
  • 8g Protein – Split Peas (Cooked)
  • 8g Protein – Great Northern Beans (Cooked)
  • 8g Protein – Yardlong Beans (Cooked)
  • 8g Protein – Kidney Beans (Cooked)
  • 8g Protein – Lima Beans (Cooked)
  • 8g Protein – Black Turtle Beans (Cooked)
  • 8g Protein – Navy Beans (Cooked)
  • 8g Protein – Chickpeas (Garbanzo Beans, Bengal Gram) (Cooked)
  • 7g Protein – Mungo Beans (Urad Dal, Black Dal) (Cooked)
  • 7g Protein – Broad (Fava) Beans (Cooked)
  • 7g Protein – Mung Beans (Cooked)
  • 7g Protein – Cowpeas (Blackeyes) (Cooked)
  • 7g Protein – Adzuki Beans (Cooked)
  • 7g Protein – Pigeon Peas (Red Gram) (Cooked)
  • 7g Protein – French Beans (Cooked) (Green Beans, Haricots Verts)
  • 5g Protein– Kidney Beans

Fruits:

  • 4g Protein – Currants, Dried
  • 4g Protein – Bananas, Dried
  • 4g Protein – Lychee, Dried
  • 4g Protein – Plums, Dried
  • 3g Protein – Raisins, Dried
  • 3g Protein – Figs, Dried
  • 3g Protein – Tamarind, Raw
  • 3g Protein – Guava, Raw
  • 2g Protein – Avocado, Raw
  • 2g Protein – Passion Fruit, Raw
  • 2g Protein – Sapote, Raw
  • 2g Protein – Sugar Apples (Sweetsop), Raw
  • 2g Protein – Pears, Dried
  • 2g Protein – Custard Apple, Raw
  • 2g Protein – Cherimoya, Raw
  • 2g Protein – Pomegranates, raw
  • 2g Protein – Jackfruit, raw

Tryptophan

Tryptophan is an essential amino acid needed for general growth and development, producing niacin, and creating serotonin in the body. It is a myth that the tryptophan in turkey makes you tired, it is from the excessive amount of food and calories they consume and the energy going towards digestion that actually makes people tired.

Vegan foods highest in tryptophan:

(Sorted by recommended daily intake, RDI)

·         206% – Pumpkin And Squash Seeds (1 cup )

·         108% – Raw Yellow Beans (3.5 oz)

·         91% – Lupin beans (1 cup)

·         91% – White Beans (1 cup)

·         84% – Beans (1 cup)

·         84% – Yellow Beans (1 cup)

·         80% – Split Peas (1 cup)

·         80% – Black Beans (1 cup)

·         78% – Pink Beans (1 cup)

·         78% – Falafel (5 oz)

·         73% – Adzuki Beans (1 cup)

·         72% – Pumpkin Seed Kernels (1 oz)

·         65% – French Beans (1 cup)

·         62% – Mungo Beans (1 cup)

·         62% – Whole-Wheat Spaghetti (7.5 oz)

·         61% – Garbanzo Beans (1 cup)

·         58% – Spirulina (0.5 oz)

·         53% – Green beans (3 oz)

·         50% – Linseeds (1 oz)

·         49% – Red Gram Pigeon Peas (1 cup)

·         49% – Sesame Seeds (1 oz)

·         48% – Peanuts (1.7 oz)

·         46% – Toasted Sesame Seeds (1 oz)

·         45% – Tofu (Salted And Fermented) (3 oz)

·         44% – Oats (1.5 oz)

·         44% – Sunflower Seed Kernels (1 oz)

·         36% – Grains, Buckwheat (1.5 oz)

·         36% – Pistachio (1 oz)

·         33% – Grains, Oat Bran, Cooked (5 oz)

·         33% – Toasted Sunflower Seed Kernels (1 oz)

·         31% – Dry Couscous (1.5 oz)

·         30% – Grains, Quinoa, Cooked (5 oz)

·         30% – Cashew Nuts (1 oz)

·         29% – Rye (1.5 oz)

Leucine

Is an essential amino acid used in the liver, fat tissue, and muscle tissue. Leucine is also suspected to be the only amino acid which can stimulate muscle growth, and can also help prevent the deterioration of muscle with age.

Vegan foods highest in leucine:

(Sorted by recommended daily intake, RDI)

·        107% – Soybeans (1 Cup)

·         90% – Lupin beans (1 Cup)

·         76% – Raw Yellow Beans (3.5 Oz)

·         67% – Adzuki Beans (1 Cup)

·         64% – White Beans (1 Cup)

·         60% – Yellow Beans (1 Cup)

·         56% – Black Beans (1 Cup)

·         55% – Pink Beans (1 Cup)

·         54% – Split Peas (1 Cup)

·         52% – Mungo Beans (1 Cup)

·         48% – Garbanzo Beans (1 Cup)

·         46% – French Beans (1 Cup)

·         37% – Red Gram Pigeon Peas (1 Cup)

·         34% – Whole-Wheat Spaghetti (7.5 Oz)

·         33% – Peanuts (1.7 Oz)

·         33% – Green beans (3 Oz)

·         32% – Spirulina (0.5 Oz)

·         32% – Pumpkin Seed Kernels (1 Oz)

·         29% – Grains, Sorghum (1.5 Oz)

·         27% – Grains, Millet, Cooked (5 Oz)

·         27% – Stir-Fried Sprouted (2.3 Oz)

·         25% – Oats (1.5 Oz)

·         23% – Tofu (Salted And Fermented) (3 Oz)

·         23% – Grains, Corn, Yellow, Field, Dry (1.5 Oz)

·         22% – Sunflower Seed Kernels (1 Oz)

·         21% – Pistachio (1 Oz)

·         20% – Dried Dulse (0.5 Oz)

·         20% – Roasted Almond (1 Oz)

·         20% – Blanched Almond (1 Oz)

·         19% – Grains, Cornmeal (Yellow), Whole-Grain (1.5 Oz)

·         19% – Dried Almond (1 Oz)

·         19% – Rye (1.5 Oz)

·         18% – Sprouted (2.3 Oz)

·         18% – Sesame Seeds (1 Oz)

Threonine

Threonine is an essential amino acid with a wide range of functions ranging from maintaining a protein balance, to the creation of collagen and elastic muscle tissue like that in the heart, and production of digestive enzymes.

Vegan foods highest in Threonine:

(Sorted by recommended daily intake, RDI)

·         146% – Soybeans (1 Cup)

·         112% – Lupin beans (1 Cup)

·         103% – Raw Yellow Beans (3.5 Oz)

·         86% – White Beans (1 Cup)

·         85% – Beans (1 Cup)

·         80% – Yellow Beans (1 Cup)

·         75% – Black Beans (1 Cup)

·         74% – Pink Beans (1 Cup)

·         69% – Adzuki Beans (1 Cup)

·         68% – Split Peas (1 Cup)

·         63% – Garbanzo Beans (1 Cup)

·         62% – French Beans (1 Cup)

·         55% – Mungo Beans (1 Cup)

·         50% – Spirulina (0.5 Oz)

·         47% – Red Gram Pigeon Peas (1 Cup)

·         46% – Green beans (3 Oz)

·         45% – Peanuts (1.7 Oz)

·         34% – Whole-Wheat Spaghetti (7.5 Oz)

·         33% – Pumpkin Seed Kernels (1 Oz)

·         31% – Tofu (Salted And Fermented) (3 Oz)

·         31% – Sunflower Seed Kernels (1 Oz)

·         30% – Linseeds (1 Oz)

·         29% – Oats (1.5 Oz)

·         27% – Rye (1.5 Oz)

·         25% – Grains, Buckwheat (1.5 Oz)

·         25% – Sesame Seeds (1 Oz)

·         24% – Dried Dulse (0.5 Oz)

·         24% – Sprouted (2.3 Oz)

·         23% – Steamed Sprouted (2.3 Oz)

·         23% – Toasted Sesame Seeds (1 Oz)

·         23% – Roasted Almond (1 Oz)

·         23% – Toasted Sunflower Seed Kernels (1 Oz)

·         23% – Blanched Almond (1 Oz)

·         23% – Pistachio (1 Oz)

Lysine

Lysine is an essential amino acid involved in the creation of collagen and absorption of calcium. Lysine may also help alleviate herpes simplex infections.

Vegan foods highest in Lysine:

(Sorted by recommended daily intake, RDI)

·         112% – Soybeans (1 Cup)

·         84% – Raw Yellow Beans (3.5 Oz)

·         81% – Lupin beans (1 Cup)

·         77% – Adzuki Beans (1 Cup)

·         70% – White Beans (1 Cup)

·         69% – Split Peas (1 Cup)

·         65% – Yellow Beans (1 Cup)

·         61% – Black Beans (1 Cup)

·         61% – Pink Beans (1 Cup)

·         57% – Garbanzo Beans (1 Cup)

·         53% – Mungo Beans (1 Cup)

·         50% – French Beans (1 Cup)

·         47% – Red Gram Pigeon Peas (1 Cup)

·         35% – Green Beans (3 Oz)

·         25% – Spirulina (0.5 Oz)

·         24% – Peanuts (1.7 Oz)

·         21% – Pumpkin Seed Kernels (1 Oz)

·         20% – Pistachio (1 Oz)

·         19% – Grains, Quinoa, Cooked (5 Oz)

·         18% – Steamed Sprouted (2.3 Oz)

·         18% – Oats (1.5 Oz)

·         17% – Grains, Buckwheat (1.5 Oz)

·         17% – Lambsquarters (3 Oz)

·         16% – Sunflower Seed Kernels (1 Oz)

·         15% – Rye (1.5 Oz)

·         15% – Linseeds (1 Oz)

·         15% – Green Peas (3 Oz)

·         15% – Boiled Sprouted Beans (2.3 Oz)

·         14% – Frozen Green Peas (3 Oz)

·         14% – Whole-Wheat Spaghetti (7.5 Oz)

·         14% – Cashew Nuts (1 Oz)

·         14% – Green Peas (1/2 Cup)

·         13% – Wild Rice (5 Oz)

Methionine

Is an essential amino acid involved in the creation of cartilage and may also help prevent hair loss and strengthen nails. Only a small amount is needed per day. A diet low in methionine may also extend lifespan. Plant based foods are typically have a lower % of methionine than animal based foods.

Vegan foods highest in Methionine:

(Sorted by recommended daily intake, RDI)

·         45% – Soybeans (1 Cup)

·         37% – Raw Yellow Beans (3.5 Oz)

·         34% – Brazil nuts (1 Oz)

·         31% – White Beans (1 Cup)

·         29% – Falafel (5 Oz)

·         29% – Yellow Beans (1 Cup)

·         27% – Black Beans (1 Cup)

·         27% – Pink Beans (1 Cup)

·         23% – Mungo Beans (1 Cup)

·         22% – Garbanzo Beans (1 Cup)

·         22% – French Beans (1 Cup)

·         21% – Lupin beans (1 Cup)

·         21% – Adzuki Beans (1 Cup)

·         21% – Whole-Wheat Spaghetti (7.5 Oz)

·         20% – Pumpkin Seed Kernels (1 Oz)

·         20% – Split Peas (1 Cup)

·         20% – Sesame Seeds (1 Oz)

·         19% – Spirulina (0.5 Oz)

·         19% – Wild Rice (5 Oz)

·         16% – Sunflower Seed Kernels (1 Oz)

·         16% – Peanuts (1.7 Oz)

·         16% – Oats (1.5 Oz)

·         15% – Dried Dulse (0.5 Oz)

·         15% – Red Gram Pigeon Peas (1 Cup)

·         15% – Grains, Quinoa, Cooked (5 Oz)

·         14% – Green Beans (3 Oz)

·         13% – Linseeds (1 Oz)

·         12% – Toasted Sunflower Seed Kernels (1 Oz)

·         12% – Rye (1.5 Oz)

·         12% – Pistachio (1 Oz)

·         11% – Grains, Millet, Cooked (5 Oz)

·         10% – Dry Couscous (1.5 Oz)

Isoleucine

One of nine essential amino acids in humans (present in dietary proteins), Isoleucine has diverse physiological functions, such as assisting wound healing, detoxification of nitrogenous wastes, stimulating immune function, and promoting secretion of several hormones. Necessary for hemoglobin formation and regulating blood sugar and energy levels, isoleucine is concentrated in muscle tissues in humans.

Vegan foods highest in Isoleucine:

(Sorted by recommended daily intake, RDI)

·         122% – Soybeans (1 Cup)

·         102% – Lupin beans (1 Cup)

·         81% – Yellow Beans (3.5 Oz)

·         68% – White Beans (1 Cup)

·         63% – Yellow Beans (1 Cup)

·         63% – Beans (1 Cup)

·         61% – Mungo Beans (1 Cup)

·         61% – Adzuki Beans (1 Cup)

·         59% – Split Peas (1 Cup)

·         59% – Black Beans (1 Cup)

·         59% – Pink Beans (1 Cup)

·         55% – Garbanzo Beans (1 Cup)

·         48% – French Beans (1 Cup)

·         40% – Spirulina (0.5 Oz)

·         38% – Green Beans (3 Oz)

·         37% – Whole-Wheat Spaghetti (7.5 Oz)

·         36% – Red Gram Pigeon Peas (1 Cup)

·         35% – Peanuts (1.7 Oz)

·         32% – Pumpkin Seed Kernels (1 Oz)

·         31% – Stir-Fried Sprouted (2.3 Oz)

·         28% – Sunflower Seed Kernels (1 Oz)

·         26% – Oats (1.5 Oz)

·         25% – Linseeds (1 Oz)

·         23% – Pistachio (1 Oz)

·         21% – Rye (1.5 Oz)

·         20% – Steamed Sprouted (2.3 Oz)

·         20% – Dried Dulse (0.5 Oz)

·         19% – Wild Rice (5 Oz)

·         19% – Sesame Seeds (1 Oz)

·         19% – Grains, Buckwheat (1.5 Oz)

·         18% – Dry Couscous (1.5 Oz)

·         18% – Grains, Quinoa, Cooked (5 Oz)

·         18% – Cashew Nuts (1 Oz)

·         18% – Toasted Sesame Seeds (1 Oz)

·         18% – Roasted Almond (1 Oz)

Valine

Valine is an amino acid involved in curing metabolic and liver diseases. Valine also plays a role in regulating absorption of other amino acids.

Vegan foods highest in Valine:

(Sorted by recommended daily intake, RDI)

·         89% – Soybeans (1 Cup)

·         68% – Raw Yellow Beans (3.5 Oz)

·         67% – Lupin beans (1 Cup)

·         57% – White Beans (1 Cup)

·         55% – Adzuki Beans (1 Cup)

·         53% – Yellow Beans (1 Cup)

·         50% – Black Beans (1 Cup)

·         49% – Pink Beans (1 Cup)

·         48% – Split Peas (1 Cup)

·         47% – Mungo Beans (1 Cup)

·         41% – French Beans (1 Cup)

·         38% – Garbanzo Beans (1 Cup)

·         31% – Spirulina (0.5 Oz)

·         30% – Red Gram Pigeon Peas (1 Cup)

·         29% – Whole-Wheat Spaghetti (7.5 Oz)

·         29% – Peanuts (1.7 Oz)

·         28% – Pumpkin Seed Kernels (1 Oz)

·         27% – Green Beans (3 Oz)

·         25% – Oats (1.5 Oz)

·         23% – Sunflower Seed Kernels (1 Oz)

·         23% – Linseeds (1 Oz)

·         23% – Pistachio (1 Oz)

·         22% – Dried Dulse (0.5 Oz)

·         21% – Tofu (Salted And Fermented) (3 Oz)

·         20% – Rye (1.5 Oz)

·         19% – Wild Rice (5 Oz)

·         18% – Cashew Nuts (1 Oz)

·         18% – Grains, Buckwheat (1.5 Oz)

·         17% – Sesame Seeds (1 Oz)

·         17% – Toasted Sesame Seeds (1 Oz)

·         16% – Snow Peas (3 Oz)

Phenylalanine

Phenylalanine is an essential amino acid involved in creating DNA, brain signaling molecules such as dopamine, norepinephrine (noradrenaline), and epinephrine (adrenaline), and the skin pigment melanin. Phenylalanine can also be used by the body to make the amino acid tyrosine. Further, phenylalanine is used as an ingredient in artificial sweeteners containing aspartame, and may have negative health effects if consumed in high amounts. People suffering from Phenylketonuria should almost certainly limit their intake of phenylalanine.

Vegan foods highest in Phenylalanine:

(Sorted by recommended daily intake, RDI)

·         105% – Soybeans (1 Cup)

·         79% – Yellow Beans (3.5 Oz)

·         72% – Lupin beans (1 Cup)

·         69% – Red Gram Pigeon Peas (1 Cup)

·         66% – White Beans (1 Cup)

·         64% – Adzuki Beans (1 Cup)

·         62% – Yellow Beans (1 Cup)

·         58% – Black Beans (1 Cup)

·         57% – Pink Beans (1 Cup)

·         56% – Mungo Beans (1 Cup)

·         55% – Garbanzo Beans (1 Cup)

·         53% – Split Peas (1 Cup)

·         48% – French Beans (1 Cup)

·         41% – Peanuts (1.7 Oz)

·         38% – Whole-Wheat Spaghetti (7.5 Oz)

·         35% – Pumpkin Seed Kernels (1 Oz)

·         28% – Spirulina (0.5 Oz)

·         27% – Oats (1.5 Oz)

·         24% – Roasted Almond (1 Oz)

·         24% – Blanched Almond (1 Oz)

·         23% – Sunflower Seed Kernels (1 Oz)

·         22% – Dried Almond (1 Oz)

·         22% – Pistachio (1 Oz)

·         22% – Avocado (5 Oz)

·         20% – Rye (1.5 Oz)

·         20% – Linseeds (1 Oz)

·         19% – Sesame Seeds (1 Oz)

·         19% – Dry Couscous (1.5 Oz)

·         18% – Wild Rice (5 Oz)

·         18% – Toasted Sesame Seeds (1 Oz)

Tyrosine

Tyrosine is an essential amino acid involved in creating brain signaling molecules such as dopamine, and stress hormones like norepinephrine (noradrenaline), and epinephrine (adrenaline). While an essential amino acid, tyrosine can be made by the body if a person consumes enough of the amino acid, phenylalanine.

Vegan foods highest in Tyrosine:

(Sorted by recommended daily intake, RDI)

·         159% – Soybeans (1 Cup)

·         102% Raw Oats (1 Cup)

·         59% – Adzuki Beans (1 Cup)

·         54% – Split Peas (1 Cup)

·         53% – Roman (Cranberry) Beans (1 Cup)

·         49% – Beans & Black Beans (1 Cup)

·         47% – Broad Beans ( Beans) (1 Cup)

·         46% – Beans (1 Cup)

·         41% – Chickpeas (Garbanzo Beans) (1 Cup)

·         38% – Teff (1 Cup)

·         27% – Kemut (1 Cup)

·         22% – Brown Rice (1 Cup)

·         21% – Millet (1 Cup)

·         19% – Bulger (1 Cup)

·         18% – Quinoa (1 Cup)

·         18% – Cous Cous (1 Cup)

·         12% – Pearled Barley (1 Cup)

·         35% – Pumpkin Seeds (1 Oz)

·         31% – Peanuts (1 Oz)

·         24% – Sesame Seeds (1 Oz)

·         21% – Sunflower Seeds (1 Oz)

·         21% – Spirulina (1 Tbsp)

·         18% – Chia Seeds (1 Oz)

·         16% – Pine Nuts (1 Oz)

·         16% – Macadamia Nuts (1 Oz)

·         16% – Flaxseeds (1 Oz)

·         16% – Pistachio Nuts (1 Oz)

·         14% – Almonds (1 Oz)

Histidine

Istidine is important for maintenance of myelin sheaths that protect nerve cells and is metabolized to the neurotransmitter histamine. Histamines play many roles in immunity, gastric secretion, and sexual functions. Histidine is also required for blood cell manufacture and protects tissues against damage caused by radiation and heavy metals. (NCI04)

Vegan foods highest in histidine:

(Sorted by recommended daily intake, RDI)

·         130% – Lupin beans (1 Cup)

·         102% – Raw Yellow Beans (3.5 Oz)

·         85% – White Beans (1 Cup)

·         80% – Adzuki Beans (1 Cup)

·         79% – Yellow Beans (1 Cup)

·         75% – Black Beans (1 Cup)

·         74% – Pink Beans (1 Cup)

·         71% – Red Gram Pigeon Peas (1 Cup)

·         70% – Garbanzo Beans (1 Cup)

·         70% – Split Peas (1 Cup)

·         67% – Mungo Beans (1 Cup)

·         61% – French Beans (1 Cup)

·         50% – Peanuts (1.7 Oz)

·         47% – Green Beans (3 Oz)

·         45% – Whole-Wheat Spaghetti (7.5 Oz)

·         39% – Pumpkin Seed Kernels (1 Oz)

·         32% – Sunflower Seed Kernels (1 Oz)

·         31% – Almond (1 Oz)

·         30% – Oats (1.5 Oz)

·         30% – Grains, Quinoa, Cooked (5 Oz)

·         28% – Rye (1.5 Oz)

·         27% – Spirulina (0.5 Oz)

·         26% – Pistachio (1 Oz)

·         26% – Sesame Seeds (1 Oz)

·         25% – Linseeds (1 Oz)

·         25% – Toasted Sesame Seeds (1 Oz)

·         24% – Wild Rice (5 Oz)

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  • Five Health Benefits of a High Raw, H... 1. High energy levels Most people who try out a low fat, whole foods vegan diet praise the abundant energy that comes along with it. The water content, minerals, vitamins, phytonutrients, and antioxidants all keep your body running at it’s peak.  The simple sugars in fruit are easily converted to glucose, the main energy supplier [...]
  • Science behind a low-fat raw vegan di...   Science behind a low-fat raw vegan diet Written by Heather Bhagat Intro        Going back a hundred-thousand years, humans lived in a tropical environment, and thrived off a diet consisting of predominantly fruits; with the addition of tender leafy greens, and occasionally, nuts and seeds. Our nutrient requirements have not changed much since then [...]

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